Skip to main content

About your Search

20120901
20120930
STATION
WETA 27
LANGUAGE
English 27
Search Results 0 to 26 of about 27 (some duplicates have been removed)
of the united states bill clinton in conversation with me and my colleague at cbs nora o'donnell. >> rose: do you think this election the president has said that change has to come from outside rather than in washington, that this election has the possibility of producing a change that will be able to overcome gridlock. >> i don't think it to the only has the possibility, i think it almost certainly will. and let me explain why. i think the president's going to win but let's assume governor romney won. if he wins, that almost certainly means the republicans will hold on to the house and it will be about 50/50 in the senate, more or less the way it is now. you can't filibuster a budget. it's the only thing that doesn't require 60 votes in the senate to pass o as opposed to 51. so a lot of the policymaking will be pushed into the budget and he'll just have to pick up one or two people on that. if you assume that he is going to do what he said he's going to do, i think a lot of his priorities will be enacted. and i think it will be bad on the budget side, as i said. including for medicare t will
not accept what happened from some of the citizens of the united states who offended the prophet mohammed-- peace be upon him. there was also somebody who wanted to burn the koran and this is something we do not accept at all. so the demonstrations were an expression of a high level of anger and a rejection of what is happening and the u.s. embassy represents the symbol of america as a people and government so people, the demonstrators, had a loud voice and as a government, it's our responsibility as the government of egypt we protected the embassy. we do not condone any attack against any embassies or any guests. this is a part of our principles and culture and what our religion orders us to do. >> rose: so the united states government and egyptian government are friends, not enemies? >> ( translated ): we are not enemies, of course. >> rose: you're our friends? >> ( translated ): for sure we are friends. >> rose: allies? >> the u.s. president said otherwise. >> rose: i know he did. but i'm asking the egyptian president. do you consider the united states an ally? >> ( translated ): this
of saudi intelligence, ambassador to the united states and other countries >> and throughout these 80 some years that we have had our kingdom, everybody keeps talking about an uncertain future for the kingdom and because of the sagacity of the people of saudi arabia and the good will of the leadership and the government we have survived pretty well so far we have many problems to face, including syria. many challenges internally among the young people and how the go about the courses of development not just economically but socially and politically and the role of women, etc. all of these are tremendous challenges that are being debated within the kingdom and not coming from the outside. >> rose: tom friedman and prince turki al-faisal when we continue. fb captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: tom friedman is here, he is a pulitzer prize winning columnist in for the "new york times." for more than 30 years he's been writing ant foreign affairs, american politics and so much more. in addition to serving as bureau chief
to the united states. >> i think the components, the resolution of the iranian crisis there has to be negotiation, there has to be sanctions, there has to be a credible threat of war and there has to be a ladder to enable the regime to climb down. if you have all four elements in play then you can have a peaceful resolution to all of these. but if you look at it, i'm not happy, i should say this very clearly. i'm not happy with the way our foreign policy and doe midwest i can politics have become intertwined. i'm not happy at the rift between the prime minister and the administration. when he said we need to see red lines, secretary clinton said there are not going to be red lines. >> rose: we conclude with best selling author michael lewis talking about a new article he has in "vanity fair" about president obama. >> i thought what would be a fun piece of journalism to do? and i just had been struck through the course not just of this man's administration, this president's administration but previous ones just kind of a dysjuncture between the commentary on the outside and what
is still very volatile. >> absolutely, and going forward the united states is going to have to deal with this. to what extent do we make foreign assistance conditional? if so, on what kinds of behavior is? this is not limited to libya of. this is going to be the case in cairo with egypt's going forward. this is going to be an extremely difficult diplomatic process. there are going to be moments of instability, and this is not going to be short lived. i think we are talking about years and decades of uneasy relationships with regimes that are unable or unwilling to be a partner with the united states. >> you have often said this is going to take time, but we have seen what protests in tunis, protests in libya, protests in egypt, you think the washington establishment has come up with a convincing way of dealing with the arab world in light of the arab spring? >> the short answer is no. part of the middle east is i believe there is a reduction of influence for all outsiders. there is also reduction of influence for authority. it is not clear what governments can control, so i think it
against the united states without some consequencesment now that authority has been removed. the imams and other speakers at friday prayers are free to say almost whatever they want. and that makes the situation far more dangerous. >> protests and deaths in the middle east. and political implications in america when we continue. >> funding for charlie rose was provided byhe olg:lowin c c 1wi . >> rose: additional funding provided by these funders captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. in this presidential election of 2012 foreign policy was not considered to be an important factor. that's all changed now because on monday night when american diplomatic interests came under attack in egypt and libya, tragically ambassador chris stevens and three other americans were killed in benghazi, governor romney has attempted to make some political attacks out of the situation. and here is what he said. >> i think it's a-- a -- -- a terrible course for america to stand in apology for our values. >> rose: president obama responded in kin
. >> warner: the president said the united states would work with the libyan government to track down the perpetrators. >> today, we mourn four more americans who represent the very best of the united states of america. we will not waver in our commitment to see that justice is done for this terrible act. and make no mistake, justice will be done. >> warner: for now, the pentagon ordered special units of marines to libya called "fast" teams, like this detachment shown training, to reinforce security at diplomatic sites in libya. and from tripoli, the president of libya's national assembly echoed the words of his american counterparts. >> ( translated ): we apologize to the united states of america and to the american people and to the whole world for what happened, and at the same time we expect the rest of the world to help us face these cowardly criminal acts. we refuse to use our country's land as a scene of cowardly rs.rilsal >> warner: those reprisals came apparently in response to internet clips of a film titled "the innocence of muslims" that crudely defamed the prophet muhamma
, for responding to this video with violence. a> woodruffingain to distght gast to dio ance the united states' government from the film and its maker. the associated press reported that he's been identified as a coptic christian living in california with a checkered legal past. actors in the film said that they were duped, that the blasphemous and offensive dialogue was later dubbed in. and not just muslims, but coptic christians in cairo denounced the film and its apparent intent. >> ( translated ): if it is proven that there is a copt that participated in the making of this movie, the church 100% refuses him. >> woodruff: there were efforts to remove the video from view. the government of afghanistan tried to block youtube access. and in egypt and libya, youtube restricted users from playing the clip. meanwhile, american naval and military assets in the mediterranean, incding warships and drone aircraft, refocused on libya, a country they helped liberate last year as part of a u.n.-sanctioned, nato operation. >> woodruff: nancy yousseff of mcclathy y wspapers. she has been reporting on the
with the united states. gwen: you just hit on something important which is at the beginning of the week you saw the president having to make a phonon call to netanyahu, the israeli prime minister, and at the end of the week having to make a phone call to mursi, another difficult relationship. theoretically, both allies. how difficult was this for the white house to juggle? >> i think it was really difficult for them because here we have a white house that really sort of tip-toed its way through the arab spring and tried to be on the side of the ghontors but not too much and sort of tried to balance that out and i think kind of felt like they had gotten through it and all of a sudden we're back there today. this is also a president, keep in mind, who went to cairo in 2009 and said he wanted a new start with the arab world and the muslim world, you know, forget the, i mean bad things have happened in the past and here we are at the dawn of a new day. here we see now anti-american protests throughout the region. even if they're not directly against the u.s. that's how it feels. gwen: wasn't it exa
, food, clothing, shelter? we do. weyerhaeuser -- growing ideas. >> the united states condemns, in the strongest terms, this out raiders and shocking attack. >> this week, four americans died as anti-american violence spreads. the political fallout. >> an apology for america's values is never the right course. >> the ramifications of the chicago teachers strike. >> this is a strike of choice. it's the wrong choice for the children. >> in pennsylvania, challenging the new voter i.d. a lot. >> it's a criminal offense against democracy. captioned by the national captioning institute --www.ncicap.org-- >> someone releases a crudely made anti-muslim video and four americans died in libya. protesters stormed the american embassies in egypt and yemen. suddenly, the campaign is no longer about the key economy but the way the president is conducting foreign policy. >> the administration was wrong standing by a statement sympathizing for those who had breached our embassy. >> , romney has a tendency to shoot first and aim later. as president, i have learned you cannot do that. "the ameri
? >> it is an interesting moment when egypt is partially reconstructing it shrek -- its relation with the united states. the military relationship continues, and that has gone on for many years. yet now there is an elected civilian president that is trying to assert the degree of independence at a moment when both sides are now trying to understand the priorities of each other, and the united states is adjusting to an egyptian leader that has to respond to some degree to the wants and desires of his own people. it is a much more high maintenance type of relationship because nothing can be taken for granted in the same way that it was when egypt was essentially a client state. >> president morsi called syria the tragedy of the age. any new ideas there about how to stop the fighting? >> not so much. this is indicative of egypt's position at the moment. more aspirational and ambitious with respect to charting a more independent course, but of course egypt is consumed by domestic affairs, particularly on the economic front. so egypt is not in a position to really exert great influence on the syrian civil w
further monetary policy to boost the united states economy. after last friday's disappointing labor report there is a growing call for a robust response from the central bank which is the fed, financial markets have rallied with the expectation of a third round of bond buying known as cuan tative easing. but that option is controversial with the election two months away. joining me from washington david leonhardt, washington bureau chief of the "new york times". in 2011 he won a pulitzer prize for his columns on the u.s. economy. i'm pleased to have him back on this program. >> thank you, charlie. >> rose: so what might the fed do and what consequences might happen? >> well, the fed is now talking about doing a version of something it has already done a couple timesment people may have heard the phrase q e3 to refer to what this is n technical terms that is quantitative easing 3. let's skip the technical terms, in essence it would buy up assets. in the course of buying up assets it would try to reduce long-term interest rates. short trem interest rates are already essentially at zero, the
about the afghan government. i think that kabul is likely to hold. i think the united states will remain committed to the security of the afghan state for at least a decade to come. both political parties in the united states are firm on this point. i think that there's an american consensus behind continued advice and support to the afghan government. as long as that happens, the afghans with our help will be able to stand against the taliban. >> woodruff: all right. we will all continue to watch it. john nagl, vali nasr, we thank you both. >> thank you. >> ifill: still to come on the newshour, reshaping the message for the fall campaign; a change of heart for a global warming skeptic; and evidence of fraud in the medicare program. but first, with the other news of the day, here's hari sreenivasan. >> sreenivasan: authorities in china moved today to curb protests against japan that turned violent over the weekend. the tensions stem from japan's purchase of islands in the east china sea called the senkaku in japan and diaoyu in china disputed islands northeast of taiwan. it's believed th
anti-western feeling in a wide swath of the world. in the united states, the body of the dead u.s. ambassador and his three colleagues that were killed in the attack or brought home. it was a part of the world in which it once had real political power. -- they once had real political power. >> and just a brief time ago, i spoke to jeremy in cairo. i asked what the sentiment was like. >> there is a lot of anger. in egypt, it has become more complicated because a lot of local issues have been grafted onto the initial anger about the film. now, i think what is significant today is that it has spread to other countries, and i think the more other countries, and because today is the muslim day of prayer, perhaps it might be the combination, but there have been people killed. and there are real, genuine grievances behind all of this. >> jeremy bowen in tahrir square for us there. i spoke with robin wright. thank you for coming in. has the tyranny of the dictator in the middle east been replaced by the tyranny of the mob? >> that is the great danger, and the fact that this has moved in
deal signed with the united states in 2008. the government is desperate to see it through. india is one of the world's fastest-growing economies, but it also faces a major shortage of power. it is looking for new energy sources for its factories, businesses, and to cater to the needs of its rapidly-growing population. the government believed that nuclear power is one way to address this gap. as is evidenced, not everyone believes it is the only solution. bbc news, delhi. >> it was music to the ears of traders on wall street when the u.s. federal reserve announced bold steps today to help stimulate the american economy. the measures included buying $40 billion worth of mortgage debt per month until the outlook for jobs improves. at the same time, the fed lowered its growth forecast for this year. we have the details. >> business is booming for this country based in five u.s. cities. all of the 75 workers who have been employed in the last two years are the lucky ones. 12.5 million of their parallel -- their fellow americans are unemployed. the real number is probably a lot larger. many h
in the region, partly because there is a sense of gratitude towards the united states because of the role it played in toppling colonel qaddafi, but also because coy say with every conversation i have had with every libyan here in the last three or four days a sense of shock, dismay and embarrassment over what happened at the killing of the u.s. em was door. and i think that has really been a wake-up call for many here who, in fact, want to take action now against these militias and armed groups, whether they are able to do it or not is another question. >> brown: are you picking up any more about who was responsible, who's being looked at, who is being discussed over there? >> i mean it is early. most people assume that it's radical jihadist group which is known here and which now some of the militias are going after. but there is really a broader problem h h the problem is that since the fall of qaddafi the authorities are relying not on their own security forces, because they don't have any. they have subcontracted security to mililias and armed groups because they need someone to step
condemnation has given a strong message that the united states government not only condemns it, but has absolutely no support for such blasphemous videos or content anywhere. i think that is an important message. i think that should go a long way in ending the violence on many streets in the world. >> brown: but in iran, at a military parade, president mahmoud ahmadinejad accused the u.s. and others of promoting strife under the guise of protecting civil liberties. >> ( translated ): they are seeking to trigger ethnic and religious conflicts. they chant fake slogans of freedom, and claim commitment to freedom of thought and freedom of speech. >> brown: and back in pakistan, prime minister raja pervez ashraf called for the world to outlaw blasphemy. >> we are demanding that the united nations and other international organizations seek a law that bans such hate speech aimed at fomenting hatred and sowing the seeds of discord through such falsehood. >> brown: in the meantime, pakistan shut down youtube access after the web site refused to remove the anti- islamic video. and in france, auth
will happen if asd falls? >> there is definitely increasing worry in the united states administration about in whose hands these weapons are falling. >> these two stories on this special edition frontline. >> frontline is made possible by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. and by the corporation for public broadcasting. major funding is provided by the john d. and catherine t. macarthur foundation, committed to building a more just, verdant and peaceful world. and by reva and david logan, committed to investigative journalism as the guardian of the public interest. additional funding is provided by the park foundation, dedicated to heightening public awareness of critical issues. and by tfrontline journalism fund, supporting investigative reporting and enterprise journalism. >> narrator: guardian reporter ghaith abdul-ahad's journey into syria began five weeks ago on a supply route the rebels use to bring weapons from neighboring turkey. >> this is all liberated territory at the moment. >> narrator: the rebels are fighting to overthrow president bashar
Search Results 0 to 26 of about 27 (some duplicates have been removed)